May Birthstone: Emerald

Known as the most famous and valuable green gemstone, emerald is the bluish-green to green variety of beryl, a mineral species that includes aquamarine, morganite and heliodor. With it’s lush, green hue, its colour reflects new spring growth, which makes it the perfect choice of birthstone for the month of May.

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February Birthstone: Amethyst

The alluring amethyst is a variety of quartz, and enjoys a history both luxurious and hedonistic. It was first named from the Ancient Greek amethystos, meaning, ‘not drunken’, and was used to create opulent goblets for wine, which the Greeks believed would prevent them from succumbing to the effects of their merriment.

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January Birthstone: Garnet

The gorgeous garnet was named for the seeds of the pomegranate, with its deep red and clear appearance, but this beautiful gemstone also appears in green, blue or even clear besides its traditional red spectrum.

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November Birthstone: Topaz

Topaz is a gemstone steeped in history, appearing as far back as biblical texts, and was considered by the ancient Egyptians to be closely connected to the sun god, Ra, based on its vibrant yellow colouring.

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October Birthstone: Opal

Known for its luminescent, almost other-worldly radiance and containing a kaleidoscope of colours, the opal is largely a product of Australia, where it is mined underground in the red-dirt outback of Coober Pedy. As well as Australia, opals are found in countries including Mexico, Peru, Ethiopia and the Czech Republic.

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September Birthstone: Sapphire

Ranging from deep, violet hues to the brightest blue, the sapphire has been admired and revered since the Middle Ages. It has been thought to attract blessings from heaven, protect from evil and envy, build peace between enemies and even protect chastity.

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August Birthstone: Peridot

Mined by Ancient Egyptians as early as 1500 BC, the brightly-hued peridot is most often formed deep in the earth before being drawn to the surface by volcanoes. Ancient Romans often referred to the gemstone as the “evening emerald” because of its vivid green hues, making it look like a deep green emerald under their lamplight.

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